Blog Archives

Lincoln’s Industrial Revolution

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In The Decline and Rise of Lincoln I wrote about how Lincoln fell from its position as one of the most important cities in England to a rural backwater hardly able to support itself.  Now I will cover the times when Lincoln grew … Continue reading

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The Schoolboy Who Killed a King

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St Katherines Priory was a religious house of the Gilbertine Order, it stood on a site west of St Catherines, south of Sincil Drain and north of Hamilton Road.  William Griffith, the last prior, surrendered the priory in 1535 to … Continue reading

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These Water Carriers Never Made It To Mesopotamia

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I am sure most Lincolnians would understand the relevance of the title of this blogpost. By Christmas 1914 the opposing armies of the First World War became bogged down in mud and reached stalemate: each dug trenches in the battlefields of … Continue reading

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The Italian Stone Man

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This unusual, neglected building stands on Canwick Road. Joseph Fambrini, born in Italy in 1815, was a plaster manufacturer and landlord at the Packet Inn on Waterside North.  He later moved to the Crown & Cushion (now the Pelham Bridge) … Continue reading

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What’s this Lincolnshire Stuff?

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Lincolnshire Longwool was once one of the most important breeds of sheep in this country.  These sheep made the fortunes of many families in Lincolnshire: the wool from the sheep was exported to Europe and the sheep were walked to … Continue reading

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History “… is like a box of chocolates …”

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Yesterday I needed to take photographs of two houses I want to include in a forthcoming blog: one house is on Canwick Road and the other on Monks Road.  My wife kindly dropped me off at the north end of … Continue reading

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Lincoln’s Northern Medieval Suburb

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When William the Conqueror ordered the building of Lincoln Castle 166 houses, and a church, were demolished.  The people who lived in these houses were moved to an area north of the Roman north gate: this area was named New … Continue reading

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The Arboretum

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The Lincoln Commons Act of 1870 enabled Lincoln Corporation to purchase Monks Leys Common for the building of housing for Lincoln’s booming population (see On The Waterfront).  Towns and cities throughout the country were recognising the leisure needs of their people, Lincoln was … Continue reading

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Marwood and His Long Drop

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Until 1815 the place of execution in Lincoln was at the corner of Burton Road and Westgate, where the convenience store and adjoining cottages now stand, and was known as Hangman’s Ditch. The last person hanged on the old gallows was … Continue reading

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Do Not Wear Your Crown In Lincoln

St Mary le Wigford church stands next to the railway line on St Mary’s Street in today’s centre of Lincoln.  Built during the 11th century by Eirtig.  It was one of the 15 Lincoln churches that survived the Reformation: there … Continue reading

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